Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change
azadi ka amrit mahotsav

Funds for Project Tiger

Posted On: 28 MAR 2022 5:22PM by PIB Delhi

The number of tiger reserves and the total area conserved under these reserves in the country (State-wise) is at Annexure-I.

Approval of National Tiger Conservation Authority has been accorded to Sunabeda Wildlife Sanctuary, MM Hills Wildlife Sanctuary, Ramgarh Vishdhari Wildlife Sanctuary and Guru Ghasidas National Park & Tamor Pingla Wildlife Sanctuary for declaration as Tiger Reserve.  In-principle approval has been given by the National Tiger Conservation Authority to Ratapani Wildlife Sanctuary, Dibang Wildlife Sanctuary and Kaimur Wildlife Sanctuary for declaration as Tiger Reserve. 

The average life span of the tigers in the wild is generally 10-12 years and in natural ecosystem factors like old age, diseases, internecine fights, electrocution, snaring, drowning, road, rail hits etc. and a very high infant mortality observed in big cats, including tigers, accounts for majority of tiger deaths. As reported by States, the details of tiger mortality in the year 2021 are at Annexure-II.

Details of budget allocation under the ongoing Centrally Sponsored Scheme of Project Tiger for the last three years and current year are as below:

 

Year

Budget allocated

(Rs In Crore)

2018-19

350.00

2019-20

282.57

2020-21

195.00

2021-22

220.00

 

As reported by States, details of human deaths (State-wise) due to tiger attack during last three years are at Annexure-III.

To reduce the incidents of human-wildlife conflict, guidelines and Standard Operating Procedure have been issued by the Central Government through the National Tiger Conservation Authority. Under the ongoing Centrally Sponsored Scheme of Project Tiger funding assistance is provided which inter alia including ex-gratia and capacity building of staff for mitigating human-wildlife conflicts. 

The Government of India, through the National Tiger Conservation Authority, has advocated a three pronged strategy to manage human-tiger negative interactions as follows:-

  1. Material and logistical support: Funding support through the ongoing Centrally Sponsored Scheme of Project Tiger, is provided to tiger reserves for acquiring capacity in terms of infrastructure and material, to deal with tigers dispersing out of source areas. These are solicited by tiger reserves through an Annual Plan of Operation (APO) every year which stems out from an overarching Tiger Conservation Plan (TCP), mandated under Section 38 V of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. Inter alia, activities such as payment of ex-gratia and compensation, periodic awareness campaigns to sensitize, guide and advise the general populace on man-animal conflict, dissemination of information through various forms of media, procurement of immobilization equipment, drugs, training and capacity building of forest staff to deal with conflict events are generally solicited.
  2. Restricting habitat interventions: Based on the carrying capacity of tigers in a tiger reserve, habitat interventions are restricted through an overarching TCP. In case tiger numbers are at carrying capacity levels, it is advised that habitat interventions should be limited so that there is no excessive spill over of wildlife including tigers thereby minimizing man-animal conflict. Further, in buffer areas around tiger reserves, habitat interventions are restricted such that they are sub-optimal vis-à-vis the core/critical tiger habitat areas, judicious enough to facilitate dispersal to other rich habitat areas only.
  3. Standard Operating Procedure (SOPs): The National Tiger Conservation Authority has issued following three SOPs to deal with human-animal conflict, which are available in public domain:

 

  1. To deal with emergency arising due to straying of tigers in human dominated landscapes
  2. To deal with tiger depredation on livestock
  3. For active management towards rehabilitation of tigers from source areas at the landscape level.

The three SOPs inter alia include the issue of managing dispersing tigers, managing livestock kills so as to reduce conflict as well as relocating tigers from source areas to areas where density of tiger is low, so that conflict in rich source areas does not occur.                          

Also as per Tiger Conservation Plans need based and site-specific management interventions are done for improving quality of wildlife habitat for which funding is provided under the ongoing Centrally Sponsored Scheme of Project Tiger.

This information was given by Shri Rameswar Teli, Minister of State, Ministry of Labour & Employment in Lok Sabha today.

 

Annexure-I

List of Tiger Reserves alongwith their area

 

S. No.

State

Name of Tiger Reserve

Total area
(In Sq.Kms)

1

Andhra Pradesh

Nagarjunsagar Srisailam

3296.31

2

Arunachal Pradesh

Namdapha

2052.82

3

Arunachal Pradesh

Pakke

1198.45

4

Arunachal Pradesh

Kamlang

783.00

5

Assam

Manas

2837.10

6

Assam

Nameri

464.00

7

Assam

Kaziranga

1173.58

8

Assam

Orang

492.46

9

Bihar

Valmiki

899.38

10

Chhattisgarh

Udanti-Sitanadi

1842.54

11

Chhattisgarh

Achanakmar

914.02

12

Chhattisgarh

Indravati

2799.07

13

Jharkhand

Palamau

1129.93

14

Karnataka

Bandipur

1456.30

15

Karnataka

Bhadra

1064.29

16

Karnataka

Kali (Dandeli-Anshi)

1097.51

17

Karnataka

Nagarahole

1205.76

18

Karnataka

Biligiri Ranganatha Temple

574.82

19

Kerala

Periyar

925.00

20

Kerala

Parambikulam

643.66

21

Madhya Pradesh

Kanha

2051.79

22

Madhya Pradesh

Pench

1179.63

23

Madhya Pradesh

Bandhavgarh

1536.94

24

Madhya Pradesh

Panna

1598.10

25

Madhya Pradesh

Satpura

2133.31

26

Madhya Pradesh

Sanjay-Dubri

1674.50

27

Maharashtra

Melghat

2768.52

28

Maharashtra

Tadoba-Andhari

1727.59

29

Maharashtra

Pench

741.22

30

Maharashtra

Sahyadri

1165.57

31

Maharashtra

Nawegaon-Nagzira

1894.94

32

Maharashtra

Bor

816.27

33

Mizoram

Dampa

988.00

34

Odisha

Similipal

2750.00

35

Odisha

Satkosia

963.87

36

Rajasthan

Ranthambore

1411.29

37

Rajasthan

Sariska

1213.34

38

Rajasthan

Mukandra Hills

759.99

39

Tamil Nadu

Kalakad-Mundanthurai

1601.54

40

Tamil Nadu

Mudumalai

688.59

41

Tamil Nadu

Sathyamangalam

1408.40

42

Tamil Nadu

Anamalai

1479.87

43

Tamil Nadu

Srivilliputhur Megamalai

1016.56

44

Telangana

Kawal

2015.44

45

Telangana

Amrabad

2611.39

46

Uttar Pradesh

Dudhwa

2201.77

47

Uttar Pradesh

Pilibhit

730.25

48

Uttarakhand

Corbett

1288.31

Uttar Pradesh

Amangarh
(buffer of Corbett TR)

80.60

49

Uttarakhand

Rajaji

1075.17

50

West Bengal

Sunderbans

2584.89

51

West Bengal

Buxa

757.90

 

Total

 

73765.57

 

Annexure-II

As reported by States, details of tiger mortality during the year 2021

 

State

Year 2021

Andhra Pradesh

1

Arunachal Pradesh

0

Assam

6

Bihar

4

Chhattisgarh

4

Delhi

0

Goa

0

Gujarat

0

Jharkhand

0

Karnataka

15

Kerala

6

Madhya Pradesh

42

Maharashtra

27

Nagaland

0

Odisha

0

Rajasthan

1

Tamil Nadu

4

Telangana

4

Uttar Pradesh

9

Uttarakhand

3

West Bengal

1

Total

127

 

Annexure-III

Details of Human deaths by tiger attack as reported by States (State-wise)

 

S.No.

State

2018

2019

2020

2021
(upto June 2021)

Total

1

Andhra Pradesh

0

0

0

0

0

2

Arunachal Pradesh

0

0

0

0

0

3

Assam

1

0

0

0

2

4

Bihar

0

0

1

3

1

5

Chhattisgarh

0

0

0

0

0

6

Jharkhand

0

0

0

0

0

7

Karnataka

1

4

0

0

5

8

Kerala

0

0

1

0

1

9

Madhya Pradesh

2

1

6

0

14

10

Maharashtra

2

26

25

5

60

11

Mizoram

0

0

0

0

0

12

Orissa

2

0

0

0

2

13

Rajasthan

2

5

0

0

7

14

Tamil Nadu

0

0

1

0

1

15

Telangana

0

0

2

0

2

16

Uttar Pradesh

5

8

4

5

36

17

Uttarakhand

1

3

0

1

4

18

West Bengal

15

3

4

0

34

Year wise total

31

50

44

14

169

 

 

****

BY/IG



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